Lincoln Highway Gumshoes: To Bedford and Back

Check out the beautiful peaks and valleys along the Seven Mile Stretch of the Lincoln Highway! (Photo by Jennifer Sopko)

Check out the beautiful peaks and valleys along the Seven Mile Stretch of the Lincoln Highway in Pennsylvania! (Photo by Jennifer Sopko)

For my birthday I decided that wanted to take a road trip that somehow incorporated the Lincoln Highway.  I’ve really enjoyed learning more about the country’s first transcontinental highway throughout its centennial year.  After all, it passes right through the town of Ligonier, where I’ve spent a lot of time and where most of my published works are based.  In addition, I actually grew up near the Lincoln Highway, in White Oak, PA. The main road through the borough – Lincoln Way – was deliberately named in order to attract travelers off the real Lincoln Highway into McKeesport.

Well, I needed to pick a destination for our ramblings, so I thought it would be neat to spend a night in historic Bedford, Pennsylvania.  I had heard wonderful things about the town and county and I’ve passed signs and the exit for it on the PA Turnpike many a time, but never made a venture there before.  Originally known as Raystown, Bedford was incorporated around 1751, prior to the French and Indian War.  It was the site of what was later named Fort Bedford,  one of four fortified supply posts along the Forbes Road constructed across Pennsylvania – Great Britain’s 1758 campaign to capture Fort Duquesne from the French. Among other attractions, Bedford also boasts the Old Bedford Village (an 18th century living history village) and more than a dozen rare and scenic covered bridges.

To get to Bedford, I wanted to follow the original 1913 route of the Lincoln Highway.  So Dave and I spent last weekend as Lincoln Highway gumshoes, following the road east, from Greensburg to Bedford, and back.  I figured that was just far enough to allow us to take our time exploring the road with no strict timetable. I literally was a gumshoe, as I ended up stepping in gum at Grand View Point, checking out the site of the lost Ship Hotel. The one piece of gum on the ground and I found it!  Argh.

On Saturday morning we left armed with three of Brian Butko’s Lincoln Highway books (the PA traveler’s guide was invaluable), some screen shots of the Lincoln Highway Association’s interactive map (thank you for the tip, Brian!) and some recommendations from Brian and my pal Cece Otto.  I think we were pretty successful finding most if not all of the accessible sections of the 1913 route, plus some great attractions along the way, although we couldn’t hit everything, so we have some unfinished business to take care of next trip.

Dave was a great sport the whole time, hitting the brakes and turning the car around whenever we passed a turn-off, helping decipher maps and instructions and risking poison ivy while searching the roadsides for hidden history and lost sections of the road.   I think he appreciated seeing all of this history with his own eyes.

You can follow our drive using the LHA’s interactive map and learn a bit more about the portion between Greensburg and Stoystown in my previous posts about the Lincoln (here, here and here).  Here I’ll just highlight some of this past weekend’s adventure. Make sure to check out the captions for each photo.

There are so many great attractions along the Pennsylvania leg of the Lincoln Highway: historic buildings and sites; roadhouses and taverns offering delicious food; kitschy shops; murals, gas pumps and roadside giants of the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor’s 200-mile Roadside Museum; and the sites of things and places that used to be. We enjoyed a few must-see places along the way:

I think the coolest part of the trip was following the Lincoln Highway onto side roads that veer off of Route 30 and tracking down defunct sections that are no longer drivable.   Several things helped us confirm that we were indeed following the route: the interactive map, Brian’s descriptions and clues such as road signs (for “Lincoln Highway,” “Old Route 30,” Old Lincoln Highway”), businesses with “Lincoln” in their names, the telltale path of telephone poles which usually indicate a former roadway, and traces of the roadbed still detectable beneath the grass.

We stayed at the 1940’s-era Lincoln Motor Court, located about five miles west of Bedford in Manns’ Choice, as Cece recommended.  It was awesome!  Bob and Debbie Altzier and their family have owned the Lincoln Motor Court since 1983.  Long before that it had served many travelers along the Lincoln Highway as a tourist cabin court.  Today it’s the only one of its kind still in operation on the Lincoln.  Our cottage (one of twelve) was quaint and comfortable and we would definitely stay there again.

We drove through downtown Bedford on Saturday afternoon into evening.  The main street through town, Pitt Street, is the Lincoln Highway – Route 30 actually bypasses the town.  What a charming town, filled with beautiful and historic buildings and attractions!  We had dinner at the Jean Bonnet Tavern, which dates back to 1762 and sits at the intersection of two important roads: The 1758 Forbes Road and the 1755 Burd Road (later incorporated into the Glade Road in 1772). Here are a few cool things we saw as we passed through:

We took a detour off the Lincoln Highway to have Sunday brunch at the historic Bedford Springs Resort, now known as the Omni Bedford Springs Resort & Spa, which dates back to the early nineteenth century.  Dr. John Anderson began construction on the hotel in 1804 and it grew from there to serve the many people who were coming to Bedford to benefit from the medicinal properties of several mineral springs in the area, including several U.S. presidents and numerous prominent businessmen and ladies of society.  After a massive $120 billion renovation, the resort reopened a few years ago after being closed for years.

It was also fun trying to spot some history Easter eggs along the way. We saw three original concrete markers that the Boy Scouts of America installed along the Lincoln Highway in 1928 – in Ligonier, Stoystown and near the crossroads of the 1758 Forbes Road  and 1755 Burd Road (later Glade Road) in Bedford (intersection of Route 30 and Route 31). Because the Lincoln Highway, as America’s first transcontinental road, was comprised of already existing roads through the country like the ones just mentioned, we can also find traces of those roads.  Through Pennsylvania the Lincoln generally follows earlier roads includes the Pittsburgh-Philadelphia Turnpike (it was actually a string of turnpikes that stretched across the state), the Pennsylvania Road and the Forbes Road.  We were able to find the locations of four circa 1818 markers from the Bedford-Stoystown Turnpike, thanks to Brian’s traveler’s guide; two of them on the Lincoln Highway and the two other are located on Route 30 where it diverges from the Lincoln.  However, we sadly discovered that one is no longer there – only the base of the marker remains. Was it accidentally hit and demolished by a passing car? Or was it deliberately stolen (and sold)? If it’s the latter, I’m not only sad, I’m also angry. Part of that marker’s historical significance is the spot where it is located and to remove it from there is just reprehensible.

Well, it was a jam-packed weekend traveling along the Lincoln Highway.  I hope to get back out there again to explore additional sections of the road. This has just been a fun experience learning about this important road this past year.  I have much respect for those highway historians and artists out there that have traveled this road extensively and solo.  I couldn’t have followed the road as diligently as we did without having Dave along or my friends’ advice and I thank everyone for your help! Readers, if there’s anything we may have missed that you suggest we check out in this area, or what we should look out for on future trips east and west, leave me a comment below!

Advertisements

On the Road with Ligonier Valley Vignettes: The Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival

It was a beautiful (and hot day) along the lower lake at Twin Lakes Park. (Photo by Jennifer Sopko)

I hope everyone had a nice long Fourth of July weekend!

I had a pretty busy weekend between holiday festivities, social outings and participating in the Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival last Friday.  I had already planned to help out at the Westmoreland Heritage booth that evening, but decided at the last minute to try and sell some copies of Ligonier Valley Vignettes.  I figured it would be a good learning experience and also allow me to practice interacting with people as a seller.

Here I am beating the heat on the Heritage Trail! (Photo by David Zajdel)

Here I am beating the heat on the Heritage Trail! (Photo by David Zajdel)

All in all the WAAHF was a really great experience and I’m glad I took a chance and participated in the festival.  Dave came along to help man the booth I had from 11:00am until 3:00pm and I was grateful for his help greeting people, filling our cooler with cold drinks, and buying us some delicious kettle corn.  Thankfully my booth was set up on the Heritage Trail, which was a shady, tree-lined path off of the main vendor area that wrapped around the lower lake at Twin Lakes Park in Greensburg, PA.  It was really sunny and hot that day so I was glad to be in the shade.  I think the heat chased quite a few people to the trail!

I sold a few books and got the chance to meet and talk to some folks who stopped by to check out my book, including a gentleman from Ligonier who told us about performing in a band as a ninth grader during the town’s bicentennial celebration in 1958.  He remembered President Eisenhower’s visit to the town for the celebration!  I also met Jessica Kadie-Barclay, the managing director of West Overton Village and Museums in Scottsdale, PA, who was hunkered down in a neighboring booth.  We bonded over our mutual hate of creepy-crawly forest-dwelling bugs! Bleck! Dave and I decided we really want  to check out the village and museums sometime this summer, especially the distillery!

A view of all the wonderful free materials available from Westmoreland Heritage. (Photo by Jennifer Sopko)

A view of all the wonderful free materials available from Westmoreland Heritage. (Photo by Jennifer Sopko)

After we cleaned up the booth for the evening’s author to take over, I walked around the festival for a little while before heading over to join some other folks at the Westmoreland Heritage booth located at the beginning of the Heritage Trail.  Westmoreland Heritage works in conjunction with the Westmoreland County Historical Society and local cultural and historical organizations to promote heritage tourism throughout the county.  I was glad to help them out.

These nice flowers from my sister worked perfectly in this mug! (Photo by Jennifer Sopko)

These nice flowers from my sister worked perfectly in this mug! (Photo by Jennifer Sopko)

Thank you to everyone who stopped by my booth to pick up a copy of Ligonier Valley Vignettes, check out my booth or chat! Thank you to my sister, Michele, for helping me get organized for the festival.  Thank you to Dave for braving the heat and helping me set up and peddle my book during the whole block of time. Thank you to the rain for holding off.  Thank you to WAAHF Dxecutive Director Adam Shaffer, for giving me the opportunity to come on board at the last minute. I am looking forward to participating again next year, which will be the festival’s 40th anniversary.

Here are a few more pictures from the 2013 Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival: